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MEET THE ANIMALS

At least 115 million animals are used in laboratory experiments around the world each year1—and even this may be an underestimation. Every day in research laboratories, animals are exposed to a battery of cruel experiments—although superior, nonanimal alternatives are available.

Rabbit Who are the animals? They are dogs, cats, monkeys, rabbits, mice, horses, rats, birds, fish —and many others.

In research that often produces misleading results—and poses real risks to human health—they can experience early separation from their mothers, social isolation, prolonged captivity, sensory deprivation, and repeated physical harm. Then they are usually euthanized when they are no longer considered useful to research.

Mouse

Science often neglects their wide array of psychological and social lives. When animals in a laboratory are denied basic social, psychological, and physical needs, including the ability to act on their natural instincts, they are deprived of the basic elements that are critical to their well-being.

Learn more about many of the animals needlessly used for medical experimentation and their complex emotions and behaviors. Then read about the superior nonanimal methods— and how you can take action to end outdated and wasteful animal tests.

1Dr. Hadwen Trust. New research reveals 115 million animals used in experiments worldwide. Available at: http://www.drhadwentrust.org/news/new-research-reveals-115-million-animals-used-in-experiments-worldwide. Accessed March 5, 2009.

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